Category Archives: Art For Children

Overview of the Bali art infrastructure 2019

‘Mahardika’ the group exhibition, featured installation ‘Freedom of Expression’ 2019 by Kadek Kusuma Yatra 200 x 200cm Video installation, open 19 October – 1 December 2019 at TiTian Art Space Nyuh Kuning, Ubud

Overshadowed by the creative hubs of Java, Bandung, Jakarta and Yogyakarta, Bali is often disregarded by international art lovers and this may be due to the tourism-led commodification of art and culture.  However, in the past six years, there has been significant development in the fascinating and distinct Bali art infrastructure.

Bali was not immune to the dramatic decline that occurred after 2008 with the crash of the Indonesian modern and contemporary art markets. The immediate signs of the downturn were the closure of leading contemporary art galleries Gaya in Ubud, and Kendra in Seminyak. Activities at other notable galleries Tony Raka in Ubud and, BIASA ArtSpace in Seminyak wound down as well. Only galleries financially supported by profitable hotels, namely  Komaneka in Ubud, Santrian in Sanur and Ganesha in Jimbaran maintained their exhibition schedules.

During the post-boom period, the established art institutions Museum Puri Lukisan, Neka Art Museum, ARMA and Bentara Budaya Bali continued with consistent programmes. The museum exhibitions were mostly dedicated to the Ubud, Batuan, Keliki and Pengosekan traditional Schools of painting, while representing an array of artists in group and solo shows, including Ketut Madra, Wayan Darlun and Made Astawa. Significant developments in the contemporary art infrastructure occurred with the opening of artist-driven initiatives Luden House in Ubud in 2009, Cata Odata Art Space in Ubud in 2014, and Ketemu Project Space in Batubulan in 2015. 

The large white bamboo installation ‘Not For Sale’ set in rice fields north of Ubud by Balinese landowner, social activist, and artists Gede Sayur and friends, quickly became a unique landmark.  Committed to art with a social and environmental conscience, Sayur founded Luden as an art space and gallery. ‘Not For Sale’ evolved in 2010 in response to the alarming rate of Balinese agricultural land being sold for development and grew to become a social movement. Cata Odata focused their cross-disciplinary programmes towards emerging artists from East Java and Bali, while Ketemu’s model has a strong regional focus on programmes including artists and curators. Their July 2016 group exhibition at Sudakara Art Space, Sanur “Merayakan Murni”(Celebrating Murni), a tribute to the iconic Balinese woman artist IGAK Murniasih (1966-2006), was one of the most anticipated events that year. These initiatives provided a much-needed impetus for the art community.

Developments within the traditional art world were the formation of new collectives Baturlangun in Batuan village and the Werdi Jana Kerti Artists Association in Keliki. Strong leadership dedicated to regeneration of the styles has led to exciting new talent emerging from both of these villages in recent years such as Wayan Aris Sarmanta and Wayan Budiarta from Batuan and Putu Kusuma and Putu Adi from Keliki. Baturlangun’s first exhibition at ARMA in 2012 featured works by emerging, established, and senior artists, including women. Since 2006 Larasati Auctioneers has established an international forum for the trade of high-quality Balinese art, providing strong support in developing the market.  Two yearly auctions are held in Ubud, which expanded to three sales in 2019.

‘Kayu’ a new alternative platform for Indonesian and international contemporary art, opened in 2014, at Rumah Topeng Dan Wayang Setia Dharma (House of Masks & Puppets), in Mas, Ubud. Curated by Ubud based Italian artist Marco Cassani, ‘Kayu’ is an exhibition series that is a part of a global initiative by Lucie Fontaine for the exchange of information and knowledge between the global art world.

The opening of Art Bali 2019 “Speculative Memories” was highlighted by a fashion parade by the Fashion Council of Western Australia (FCWA) which annually holds the Perth Fashion Festival (PFF)

One of the most significant inclusions in the infrastructure TiTian Art Space, after three years in Jalan Bisma, this October moved to larger, more accessible premises in Nyuh Kunning, Ubud. An artist incubator nurturing emerging talent to become art entrepreneurs, it was established by the TiTian Bali Foundation and the vision of Balinese art and entrepreneurial expert Soemantri Widagdo.  The annual TiTian Prize, with sections for children and adult, has quickly attracted the island’s finest talent to participate, propelling the winners Nyoman Arisana and Wayan Aris Sarmanta, into the national spotlight. The recent exhibition “Mahardika” 19 October – 1 December featured works by Wayan Sadu, Nyoman Bratayasa and Kadek Kusuma Yasa.

Bali’s rapidly evolving street art movement is transforming the streets of urban and rural Bali. Swiss urban art enthusiast Julien Thorax opened the gallery and art supplies shop in Canggu, ALLCAPS Store, in 2015. A vibrant sub-culture of social media savvy millennials, and national and international street artists now thrive in the Canggu – Berawa Beach area.

An exhibition highlight of 2019 ‘Drawing Bali Today’ 10 October – 10 November at Sika Gallery, Ubud revealed developments within the context of Balinese technical painting by emerging and mid-career artists. Such developments have been a response to the ‘Neo Pitimaha’ art movement, established in 2013 by art provocateurs Gede Mahendra Yasa and Kemal Ezedine, who have been hosting events and exhibitions in Bali and Java from 2016. The movement reinterprets Balinese traditional technical painting from a contemporary art perspective – retaining the principles involved with the techniques and methods.  By opening this to new viewpoints they awakened a new spirit and introduced a fresh model of possibilities into Balinese art. Ezedine has recently been proactive with exhibitions with some of the core members of the movement, while his “Drawing Lab”, continues on with the Neo Pitamaha ideals influencing the mindset of young Balinese painters.

In just as few years CushCush Gallery, a dynamic and highly active multi-disciplinary platform open in July 2016 in Denpasar and founded by Suriawati Qiu and Jindee Chua, has become the most vital addition to the infrastructure, next to TiTian. An art and design hub dedicated to supporting the many local and international creatives and communities in and around the city, the breadth of their annual DenPasar event, which began in 2017, is always fresh and inspiring.

Artists pose with their works during the opening of during the opening of “Art Exhibition by Children Sanggar Bares – There is no Truth only HONESTY” 12 – 31 October 2019 at the Nyana Tilem Museum, in Mas. Image courtesy Soemantri Widagdo

An international standard exhibition space and contemporary art exhibition has finally arrived in Bali. The major drive for both initiatives that opened late 2018, however, comes from Java. ART • BALI, the exhibition this year in its second edition, and the purpose-built AB • BC Building in Nusa Dua, funded by BEKRAF the Agency for Creative Economy Indonesia, are exciting developments of a global art calibre upon the art landscape. 

Heri Pemad Management from Yogyakarta introduced their ‘ArtJog’ model, highlighting Indonesian contemporary artists with invited internationals. The annual ‘Bali Masters’ exhibition was first held in March 2019; its second edition is due early 2020. External direction over locally based management, and Javanese curators, however, may not be the best mode of capitalizing on Bali’s distinct artistic character and presenting it on the international stage. ‘Balinese Masters: Aesthetic DNA Trajectories of Balinese Visual Art’ featured an array of strong work, the show suffered, however, from confusing curatorial objectives, beginning with a puzzling title, and then including too much work without the benefit of a practical chronological order allowing it to be easily read and understood by the audience.

Tony Raka Art Gallery now merges tribal art with the contemporary, along with the ‘Art Lounge’ activated a few years ago. The venue has recently grown to include the ‘Creative Space’, an expansive event facility at the rear of his gallery. Open 2016 Nyaman Gallery in Seminyak has quickly made its mark, while evolving to include workshop facilities. Uma Seminyak, a new display space open 2017 highlights emerging Balinese and Indonesian contemporary artists and designers.  BIASA ArtSpace has revamped its vision with the new BIASACube, an exhibition space within their Kerobokan boutique open early 2018, and another space BIASA Ubud opened late last year, next door to their boutique in Sanggingan. 

Government support for modern and contemporary art is entering a new era. Gurat Art Project, an arm of the research and curatorial initiative Garut Institute, with the aid of the Badung Regency Administration, has been presenting events now since 2017. The 2019 five-year appointment of artist Dr Wayan Kun Adnyana as the Director of the Cultural Office of Provincial Bali has had an immediate impact ‘Bali Megarupa’ (10 October – 10 November) which featured 103 artists exhibiting at ARMA, Museum Puri Lukisan, Neka Art Museum and Bentara Budaya Bali Cultural Center. “Bali Megarupa” will continue annually for five years with the intention of becoming a yearly long-term fixture on the Bali art calendar consolidated by Provincial law.

‘Ancient Memories’ 2019 – Joel Singer, digital montages from an ongoing series by Singer, some of which were on display at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, Mas, Ubud

2019 closed with two more significant additions to the Bali art infrastructure – Ubud Diary a new gallery opened 30 November with a group exhibition of Ubud School paintings and a book launch “Ubud Diary: Celebrating the Ubud School of Painting – the Diversity of the Visual Language”. Ubud Diary’s mission is to create a new awareness to the historically significant, yet declining Ubud School. BATU Art Space, a Space For Contemporary Art Collection and Research at the House of Masks & Puppets in Mas, Ubud opened 7 December highlighted by “Manifesto” an exhibition by leading Australian artist Sally Smart.

This article was first published:

https://www.artandmarket.net/analysis/2019/12/28/bali-art-infrastructure-2019

Words and Images, unless specified: Richard Horstman

New guidebook highlights artistic & design events in Bali throughout October – December 2019

The "Bali Art+Design Guide X Bali Art Roads" Oct - Dec 2019 Image Richard HorstmanThe first Bali Art+Design Guide X Bali Arts Road, a pocket guidebook that charts a plethora of events around the island, ranging over three months beginning in October, until the end of December 2019.

 

The Balinese Pawukon calendar is not used to measure time; it encompasses smaller cycles within larger ones. Its purpose is to pinpoint certain days that help to provide a cultural framework of how the people may most effectively conduct certain social, religious, agrarian and creative activities on the most auspicious days according to their sacred beliefs. The month of October presents many appropriate dates to hold artistic events; therefore it is crammed full with art and creative happenings; unofficially it is the ‘Bali Art Month’.

The favourable circumstances of timing have provided the unique opportunity, and inspired the creative communities of Bali, along with visiting internationals, to present a diverse program of events of the calibre to rival that from the creative hubs of Java, and the popular JAW (Jogja Art Weeks) held earlier this year throughout the Central Java regency, and Bandung Art Month, that recently concluded in mid-September in West Java.

Opening of "Mahardika" group exhibition 19 October at TiTian Art Space, Nyuh Kunning, Ubud. Image Richard HorstmanOpening of “Mahardika” group exhibition 19 October at TiTian Art Space, Nyuh Kuning, Ubud

 

2019 welcomes the publication of the first Bali Art+Design Guide X Bali Arts Road, a pocket guidebook that charts a plethora of events around the island, ranging over three months beginning in October, until the end of December. These events include exhibitions, film screenings, music, dance and theatre performances, discussions, open studios and festivals complete with the relevant details and appropriate maps.

“When I travel to other cities within Indonesia or abroad, I find having a guidebook focusing specifically on art and design is very helpful for discovering and exploring the local creative scenes,” said Suriawati Qiu, Bali Art+Design Guide X Bali Arts Road co-director and co-founder of CushCush Gallery in Denpasar. “There are many art and creative communities and spaces in Denpasar and Bali that are, unfortunately, relatively unknown to the public. Having Bali’s own Art+Design guidebook will benefit both our creative communities who are doing amazing works, as well as travellers and locals alike who are interested in art and design.”

The opening of Art Bali 2019 "Specultive Memories" was highlighted by a fashion parade by the Fashion Council of Western Australia (FCWA) which annually holds the Perth Fashion Festival (PFF) Image Richard HorstmanThe opening of Art Bali 2019 ‘Speculative Memories’ was highlighted by a fashion parade by the Fashion Council of Western Australia (FCWA) which annually holds the Perth Fashion Festival (PFF)

 

The Bali Art+Design Guide X Bali Arts Road is an evolution from the DenPasar Art+Design Map first published in 2017 in conjunction with DenPasar Art+Design program, a collective effort by the creative communities of Denpasar along with CushCush Gallery as the central activities venue. It set out to mark the city with its distinct character as a hub for contemporary arts, design and culture.

In 2019 CushCush Gallery collaborates with ART • BALI, the second edition of the annual Indonesian contemporary art exhibition organized by Heri Pemad Management of Yogyakarta, Central Java. Themed SPECULATIVE MEMORIES, open 13 October 2019 – 13 January 2020, it is held at the AB • BC Building, Bali Collection, ITDC District, Nusa Dua, Bali. The exhibition presents forty-nine selected works, consisting of paintings, sculptures, installations, photography, multimedia and video from 32 Indonesian and overseas artists who also reside and, or work in Indonesia. It showcases some of the finest established and emerging contemporary artists in Bali’s premiere; purpose-built international standard exhibition space to local and foreign audiences.

Seminyak Design Week -EXHIBITION VIEW PHOTO Courtesy - ANDITO WASI                         Seminyak Design Week – exhibition view

 

Bali Arts Roads (BAR) was an initiative introduced by ART • BALI in 2018 as a side program to highlight and promote the depth of the Bali art community through exhibitions, events and open studios programs throughout the island. This year it combines with the DenPasar Art+Design Map into 180-page booklet helping to consolidate Bali’s diverse array of creativity. This year the guide covers events and programs not only in Denpasar but also in Ubud, Seminyak, Canggu and Nusa Dua, during October – December, with over 130 events listed. The booklet features a QR Code that pinpoints selected event destinations on Google Maps to allow direct and straightforward navigation.

The guide also includes important cultural and institutional locations such as museums, government and cultural institutions, art and design educational institutions, cultural heritage sites, public spaces and monuments within the city of Denpasar. Some of the festivals featured are Seminyak Design Week 2019 18 – 27 October themed “Designing for a Better Community” and runs with a program of exhibitions, talks, pop-up markets, a design trail and workshops at Gallery Vivere and Uma Seminyak. The Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, 23 – 27 October (festival events noted within the booklet), and Kita Lo Gini 5 at ISI Denpasar, a student art party presenting artworks and performances 25 – 26 October.

Artists pose with their works during the opening of during the opening of "Art Exhibition by Children Sanggar Bares - There is no Truth only HONESTY" 12 – 31 October at the Nyana Tilem Museum, in Mas. Image courtesy Soemantri WidagdoArtists pose with their works during the opening of ‘Art Exhibition by Children Sanggar Bares – There is no Truth only HONESTY’ 12 – 31 October at the Nyana Tilem Museum, in Mas

 

Other diverse happenings include tours, Urban Walk Denpasar a free open to the public guided tour of Denpasar heritage sites on 2 November, Herb Walk on 27 October, an investigation into the edible medicinal plants and related practices, Basic Macrame Workshop 12 October at CANAAN X ROU, Seminyak, Curator in Residence, a program initiated by DenPasar Art + Design: In Transition November – December at CushCush Gallery, Denpasar with the curatorial conversation #1 14 December, International Conference ICATUS 2019 the first international conference on architecture, technology and urban sustainability 27 – 28 November at Gedung Pascasarjana, Kampus UNUD, Denpasar, Parade Teater Canasta, 23 – 30 November at Canasta Creative Space Denpasar featuring Balinese theatre communities and the Odyssey Music Art Conference & Day Festival 2019 10 – 13 October at Artotel Sanur and Artotel Beach Club.

Just a few of the art exhibitions during October: Natisa Jones’s Love is Never Lonely 5 October – 9 November at Tony Raka Gallery, Ubud a ‘diversion’ from her signature style paintings. Frequency Balinese Art, Culture and Rerajahan a collection of Balinese amulet inscriptions known as rerajahan by Jro Mangku Badra, displayed within an art context and created without the sacred ritual and mantras to instil the ink drawings with their renown mystical powers, open 9 October at ARMA, in Ubud. From 10 October – 24 November at Artotel Sanur It Isn’t a Whole a solo exhibition by Putu Adi Suanjaya, and an Art Exhibition by Children “Sanggar Bares” There is no Truth only HONESTY 12 – 31 October at the Nyana Tilem Museum, in Mas.

"Jalan - Jalan" Indieguerillas at Art Bali. Image Richard Horstman                         ‘Jalan – Jalan’ Indieguerillas at Art Bali

 

The ongoing mission of Kemal Ezedine and Ketut Moniarta from the Neo Pitamaha art movement is to invigorate Balinese art by inspiring young artists to explore fresh possibilities within the technical context of the Balinese painting traditions. Drawing Bali Today opens at Sika Gallery, Ubud from 10 October 10 November. Sudra Sutra, an iconographical interpretation of the Yeh Pulu reliefs and related history by Dr Wayan Kun Adnyana opened 11 October at Neka Art Museum, Ubud until 19th October is a continuation of his visual representation inspired by the ancient Yeh Pulu stone reliefs in Bedhulu Gianyar.

Megarupa 22 October opens at ARMA Ubud with coinciding exhibitions at two other venues, the Neka Art Museum and Bentara Budaya Bali featuring the works of 103 artists, presented by the Cultural Office of the Provence of Bali. TiTian Art Space in its new premises on Jalan Raya Nyuh Kuning, Ubud present Mahardika a group exhibition 19 October – 24 November. Also open 24 October at Taman Baca, Sanggingan Ubud, Stories from Mt. Agung children’s stories of trauma expressed through drawing and poetry. Maladjustment opens 26 October – 24 November at Neka Art Museum and presents iconic artworks by Indonesian artists Arahmaiani and I GAK Murniasih along with Australian artist Mary Lou Pavlovic who exhibits her landmark, 2004 work Liar!

Audience at the opening of Drawing Bali Today at Sika Gallery. Image by @febrimarleni.           The audience at the opening of ‘Drawing Bali Today’ at Sika Gallery

 

Denpasar and Bali are increasingly developing as exciting and engaging destinations for national and international creatives to visit regularly, or to reside permanently. In recent years its art and design infrastructure has witnessed defining new growth. This provides more opportunities for participants to thrive within the burgeoning 21st – century creative economy while leading to a healthier ecosystem. These developments, importantly become a stimulant in reviving art and cultural tourism on the island of Bali.

Bali Art+Design Guide X Bali Arts Road booklet is available from numerous program participants distributed to more than 70 points throughout Bali and from AB • BC Building, Bali Collection, Nusa Dua.

Or it can be downloaded: http://artbali.co.id/page.php?p=bar

"Sarinin Angkus Prana" by Jro Mangku Badra exhibited at ARMA in "Frequency Balinese Art, Culture and Rerajahan" Image Richard Horstman‘Sarinin Angkus Prana’ by Jro Mangku Badra exhibited at ARMA in ‘Frequency Balinese Art, Culture and Rerajahan’

 

 

Words: Richard Horstman

 

Kulidan Kitchen Space: building community through creativity, education, activism & food

Volunteer art teacher Mega with local children and the outcome of one of her weekly art workshops.The volunteer art teacher at Kulidan Kitchen Space, Ni Nengah Mega Risna Dewi with local children and the outcome of one the regular art workshops.

 

One of the most satisfying phenomenon’s of Bali’s recent modern development has been the birth of an array of art and creative, multi-purpose spaces that serve as platforms for community co-working and engagement. Kulidan Kitchen Space, a new initiative in the rice fields of the Guwung village, Sukawati, fifteen minutes from Denpasar, is one such venue.

Kulidan is the name of the district’s subak, the world-renown historical irrigation structure found throughout the island defined by a system of canals directing the water into terraced rice fields that were developed on Bali during the 9th century. The Balinese Hindu religion, along with specific temples play a vital role within this agrarian management cooperative. The kitchen is at heart of the venues core philosophy, highlighting farming practices and the environment where the local people live, work and grow together in the spirit of community.

Presentation for design students at Kulidan Kitchen        Presentation for design students at Kulidan Kitchen Space during 2019

 

A priority of Kulidan Kitchen is to gather people, family, friends and guests, both local and otherwise, to sit and converse while appreciating good food and refreshments – most of which is produced by the local farmers. Of course, they enjoy the scenery, with magnificent rice fields views, sunsets, and the vista of the majestic volcanic peak of Mount Agung to the east. The multi-purpose public space consists of a large pavilion with a second storey loft, an external long table for dining experiences, the kitchen and gardens set out upon a 120 square meter expansive of land, roomy enough for events catering for up to 300 people.

The project is the vision of activist Komang Adiartha, the land upon which Kulidan Kitchen was built in 2017 belongs to his father, a local rice farmer. Adi, as he is known, is supported by a dedicated and enthusiastic team including Martino, Vifick Bolang, Ni Nengah Mega Risna Dewi, Supriyati along with the kitchen team of Surya, Didi and Wawah and also family, friends, local residents, and members of the Bali art and creative communities. A glance at Adi’s social media portals reveals an energetic and inspiring character committed to cultural and environmental preservation. He shares his relevant opinions on critical and diverse subjects such as fair trade, conscious business, clean energy, and child labour issues.

Kulidan Kitchen Space - Sukawati Image Richard HorstmanKulidan Kitchen & Space, Banjar Wangbung, Jalan Salya, Guwang, Gianyar, Bali

 

“Building community through children’s art and education are just one of our primary directives,” says Adi. “Our art programs often have an emphasis on activism, creating art to raise the local youth’s awareness of the areas farming practices in order to stimulate appreciation and respect for these time-honoured traditions.” Painting large colourful murals depicting environmental and cultural themes on wall spaces on the outside of, and opposite the venue, are ongoing creative projects led by Bali street artists, with the help of the children.

One of their well attended ongoing events “Meet the Creator”, is an inspirational sharing program where the public can meet, hear stories and engage directly with artists, musicians, designers and other creative activists. “We believe in this program as an alternative reference for young people,” Adi says. “To find or further strengthen their choices about possible professions or hobbies they may wish to pursue.”

Mural Project in the rice fields opposite Kulidan Kitchen Space - Image Richard Horstman        Mural Project in the rice fields opposite Kulidan Kitchen Space

 

During August Nele Gruender, a German art therapy student from the HKS Ottersburg University of Fine Art, Theatre, Performance and Art Therapy conducted weekly art workshops for children as a part of an academic research project involving children’s drawings. A regular visitor to Bali she has witnessed the rapid transformation of the landscape and pondered how such transformation impacts upon the living environments of young children, and how they may respond in their pictures.

“The home is the theme of my workshops,” says Gruender. “A home is a special place for growing children to develop their identity and individuality. Through my freely structured workshops, I will gather photographs of the children’s artworks which I will later research in order to discover reoccurring symbols and patterns that arise in the drawings.” Building a model of transcultural research, she plans to repeat this with German children to reveal similarities and differences in their drawings of what home means to them. “At the moment I am not sure of the outcomes,” she says. “Yet what is important is to grant these children opportunities to express their creativity while building more resources.”

20190812_085316During August 2019 Nele Gruender (top left), a German art therapy student from the HKS Ottersburg University of Fine Art, Theatre, Performance and Art Therapy conducted weekly art workshops for children as a part of an academic research project involving children’s drawings.

 

A recent Kulidan event included live music, and DJ’s performances, along with food, art and creative product stalls providing opportunities for creatives to display their products, demonstrate their creative processes, and then facilitate forums giving explanations on developing concepts with marketing plans and building business models.

“The diversity of happenings we can host is limited only to people’s imaginations, we welcome everyone, and new ideas,” Adi says. “Kulidan can be used as a public space for events according to your needs, such as meetings, performances, exhibitions, seminars, collaborations and presentations. People may hire the space and help contribute to the venues running expenses.”

Pentas teater pangeran empasPentas Teater Pangeran Empas theatre performance by children from the Kulidan community

 

Balinese children enjoying research drawing workshop conducted by German art therapy student Nele Gruender at Kulidan Kitchen 11 August 2019- Image Richard HorstmanBalinese children enjoying research drawing workshop conducted by German art therapy student Nele Gruender at Kulidan Kitchen 11 August 2019

 

67506148_696289127476917_6814809954134786048_o An exhibition of urban planning designs at Kulidan Kitchen Space during 2019

 

34579143_444838409288658_419953527016652800_oA community discussion during an exhibition in 2019 at Kulidan Kitchen Space

 

 

Kulidan Kitchen & Space,

Banjar Wangbung

Jalan Salya, Guwang, Gianyar, Bali
Tel: 0813-3866-5862

Follow @ kulidan.kitchen on Instagram

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Richard Horstman & Courtesy of Kulidan Kitchen & Space

 

Recognizing extraordinary Balinese artistic talent: the 2018 TiTian Prize

2018-003-D-SUWIDIARTA I KETUT-END AND THE BEGINNING-120 X 100 CM                                       Beginning and End – Ketut Suwidiarta

 

The Bali art infrastructure is undergoing important transformation. This renewal is a timely, yet long and unique process. The intended outcome, however, will be a sustainable art eco system on the island with the benefactors being new buyers, seasoned collectors, art lovers, the curious, and of course the artists and the industry as well.

The infrastructure currently comprises of galleries, museums, art spaces, artist studios, cultural centers, the traditional, and digital media, along with the art schools, institutions and foundations. Art awards and competitions are an essential, supportive part of any art infrastructure. They are renowned for discovering and showcasing noteworthy emerging artists and launching their careers. The exposure to gallerists, curators, collectors, the media and local and international audiences provides excellent networking opportunities, and makes the task of being “discovered” much easier.

2018-034-D-ADI WIRAWAN-MERINDUKAN BALIKU YANG DULU-120 X 120 CM                           Merindukan Baliku Yang Dulu – Adi Wirawan

 

The nine finalists and winner of the second annual TiTian Prize were announced in Ubud, 29 January 2018, during the second anniversary celebrations of Yayasan TiTian Bali (YTB). A new and visionary art foundation, inaugurated on the 80th anniversary of the founding of the famous Ubud based artist collective the Pitamaha, YTB is setting out to change the art landscape in Bali. TiTian, meaning bridge or “Stepping Stone” in the Balinese language, with its annual program of exhibitions, awards, workshops and book releases, is an experimental playground and launch pad. In essence it serves as artist incubation.

“Bali has a vast cultural heritage that is at risk due to the disruptions caused by modern technological, social and cultural changes sweeping the world,” says the YTB Chairman of the Board of Advisors Soemantri Widagdo. “YTB will assist Balinese visual artists not only to navigate and survive this massive change, but to become successful art-entrepreneurs to benefit from and to be the drivers of the new opportunities of the 21st century creative economies in Bali and Indonesia.”

2018-033-D-ARI WINATA I NYOMAN-MENAGKAP RAJA BABI-150 X 200 CM                                Menagkap Raja Babi – Nyoman Ari Winata

 

The TiTian Prize is awarded to the most promising artist who demonstrates talent and courage in breaking new ground in Balinese art. This year’s finalists are Gede Suryawan, Ari Winata, Ketut Suwidiarta, Kadek Yuliantono, Made Suartama, Ida Bagus Suryantara, Made Wahyu Senayadi and Wayan Eka Mahardika Suamba. The TiTian Prize winner is the exciting young painter from Batuan, Wayan Aris Sarmanta.

“Keluarga Bumi”, 2017 (Earth Family), by Sarmanta, is a wonderfully imaginative, glowing ‘family portrait’ featuring the father, mother and child set within and a fertile, idyllic earth playground. Elements of Balinese traditional painting merge with modern and contemporary art genes. Striking color contrasts are balanced with a superbly poised composition, highlighting the strong narrative taken from the Balinese Hindu philosophies. Light hearted elements add to the painting’s story making it a delight to observe.

2018-016-D-ARIS SARMANTA I WAYAN-KELUARGA BUMI-100 X 80 CM   The Winner of the 2018TiTian Prize “Keluarga Bumi” by Wayan Aris Sarmanta 

 

“My painting visualizes the earth family along with the abundance of nature in a harmonic, caring, and self-sustaining relationship,” says Sarmanta, who was born in Batuan in 1995. And continues, “I experienced great pleasure, along with disbelief, upon being announced this year’s winner.”

Photographs do not do “Keluarga Bumi” justice, and the painting needs to be seen to fully appreciate the fresh new approach that is currently revolutionizaring the most loved and critically acclaimed genre of Balinese art – Batuan painting. Inspirational and humourous, Sarmanta’s work is pulsating, and full of life.

The YTB presentation also includes the third annual “Anugrah Pusaka Seni” (Art Heritage) Award to artists and a patron who have made extraordinary contributions to the Balinese Arts. The winners are A.A. Gde Meregeg (1907-2001), A.A. Gde Sobrat (1912-1992), Gusti Made Deblog (1906-1986), Dewa Nyoman Mura (1877-1950), Dewa Putu Kebes (1874-1962), and Gusti Putu Sodang (unknown – 1937). The Patron Award (Life Achievement) went to Prof. Drs. A.A Rai Kalam (1940-2017) who played a definitive role in the formation of the School of Art at ISI Denpasar.

2018-012-D-SURYANTARA IDA BAGUS-PALEMAHAN-125 X 120 CM                                   Palemahan – Ida Bagus Suryantara

 

For the first time this year YTB presented children’s prizes for age groups up to 12 years, and between 13 to 17 years of age. “The Titian Prize for children is to encourage the young generation of Balinese children to learn and continue the Balinese painting tradition,” says Widagdo. “The prizes are given in recognition, appreciation and encouragement, and consist of a certificate and art materials. In the future we plan to include a program of mentoring along with museum and studio visits.”

The 2018 TiTian Prize winner will travel to Europe to attend a Bali art exhibition in late fall this year in Leiden, the Netherlands. The exhibition will feature paintings by Sarmanta and Wayan Budiarta, also from Batuan, that have recently been acquired by the National Museum of World Cultures. The winner as well will tour major museums, art galleries and exhibitions in the Netherlands.

Sarmanta’s painting“Keluarga Bumi” is on display until the end of 2018 at TiTian Art Space, located at the end of Jalan Bisma, Ubud. Open to the public daily from 9am – 5pm, except Mondays.

2018-018-D-EKA MAHARDIKA SUAMBA-JIN KURAKURA-35 X 46 CM                            Jin Kurakura – Wayan Eka Mahadika Suamba

 

2018-006-D-YULIANTO I KADEK-RENAISSANCE IN BALI-90 X 70 CM                                   Renaissance in Bali – Kadek Yulianto

 

2018-001-D-SURYAWAN EKA PUTRA-DIALOGUE IN BLUE SEASON- 51 X 71 CM                           Dialogue in Blue Season – Gede Suryawan

 

2018-009-D- SUARTAMA I MADE- BATU TENGAH-80 X 80 CM.JPG                                      Batu Tengah – Made Suartama

 

TiTian Prize Childrens Art A- KETUT SANDRA GAUTAMA-NELAYAN-24 X 36 CM                TiTian Prize Children’s Art – Ketut Sandra Gautama

 

TiTian Childrens Prize - KADEK DWIKA DHARMA PUTRA-KEBERSAMAAN-22 X 32 CM .JPG                   TiTian Prize Children’s Art – Kadek Dwika Dharma Putra

 

2018-034-A- KADEK RIPA RYAN SUPUTRA-ANAK PANTAI-25,5 X 30 CM.JPG                       TiTian Prize Children’s Art – Kadek Ripa Ryan Suputra

www.titianartspace.com

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Coutesy: TiTian Art Space

the SELFIE PROJECT – Kenyut’s artisitic exploration into popular culture

Participant in "I Love Me - the Selfie Project"                              A participant in the Selfie Project

We are living in the era of pop culture selfie mania. Technology and smartphones have democratized visual self expression, with social media and imaging apps allowing us to constantly ‘curate’ our digital presence, enhancing our obsession with our perfect self.

The Century of The Self, the landmark 2002 documentary series by British filmmaker Adam Curtis focuses upon the work of Austrian psychoanalysts Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), his daughter Anna, and his American nephew Edward Bernays. Freud was responsible for changing our perception of the mind and its workings.

A devotee of his uncle’s work, Bernays was the first to use psychological techniques in a new field of marketing he labelled Public Relations. He went on to establish a hugely influential PR consultancy in New York City in the 1920’s that was to have an unprecedented impact on western civilization.

Children participate in "I Love Me - the Selfie Project" Image Richard HorstmanChildren participate in the Selfie Project during a workshop on contemporary art by Kenyut at Tepi Sawah Festival, Ubud.

“This series is about how those in power have used Freud’s theories to try and control the dangerous crowd in an age of mass democracy,” Curtis says in his introduction to Episode One. “Bernays showed corporations how they can make people want things they didn’t need by linking mass-produced goods to their inner desires. By satisfying one’s inner selfish desires people became happy and docile. This was the start of the all consuming self, which has come to dominate the world today.”

In recent years the selfie has entered the sphere of social themes for Indonesian contemporary artists. During Jogja Art Weeks (JAW), a month-long plethora of art activities held through the months of May – June, 2017 in Yogyakarta, there were two presentations based on this theme. In Selfie Frame, collective showings by Indonesian and Polish artists, decorated frames were arranged throughout an exhibition space and visitors were invited to pose within them, and then post their selfies onto social media.

Popular young artist Oky Rey Montha, (b.1986, Yogyakarta), exhibited In Frame We Trust, 2017, at ArtJog10. He prompted the audience to engage with his installation by sitting on a toilet and taking a selfie in front of his paintings that parodied the selfie as a ridiculous act. The artists contributed nothing fresh to the critical discourse about this phenomenon, prioritizing fun experiences while appearing to utilize the opportunity simply as an attempt to “cash in”.

I Love Me - the Selfir Project by Djunaidi Kenyut                       I Love Me – the Selfie Project at Laramona, Ubud

East Javanese, Bali based artist Djunaidi Kenyut, however, takes a vastly different approach with his art project, I love Me – the Selfie Project. In his ongoing venture in community engagement beginning early this year, Kenyut randomly seeks out people and asks them to be participants by drawing their image onto a small piece of mirror with a marker pen. The image he later engraves permanently onto the glass.

“People without artistic experience often feel intimidated when I ask them to partake,” Kenyut said. “So I introduce this exercise to them in a fun, non-confrontational way with the theme drawing is easy.” The artist’s goal is to amass 2000 of these individual images and exhibit them in Surabaya, along with presenting a workshop to children at the school he attended in the city, during his childhood.

From 29 April for one month, Kenyut exhibited over 200 of these self-portraits in I Love Me – the Selfie Project, at Laramona, Ubud. Featuring an array of fascinating, often humorous manually recorded images, the exhibition opening was a unique gathering where the project participant’s creations were the focus of interest.

Participant of "I Love Me - the Selfie Project" Image Kenyut                            A participant in the Selfie Project

Kenyut continued his engagement with the public at Tepi Sawah Festival, in Pejeng, Ubud 3-4 June, a new grass-roots community celebration of music, performance and creativity, highlighted by children’s educational programs on topics including environmental awareness and sustainability. He presented a workshop to children introducing the concept of contemporary art making and involving them in the Selfie Project. The group of twenty boys and girls delighted in the opportunity to participate in a communal work by drawing their reflections upon a large mirror.

During his one-on-one interactions, Kenyut learns about the character of the participants. “For some, the task of drawing their reflection is easy, while for others it’s difficult because they are afraid of their self-appearance,” he said. “In the mirror, they tend to see one of two things, and then chose to either imitate their true reflection or create an ideal image of the self. Some people focus on the creative process, while others focus on the results.”

“When people become hesitant I encourage them, and if they are not happy with the result it can be erased, and they can try again,” he said. During this process, Kenyut carefully prompts them to look into the mirror and engage with their reflection, to look beyond the physical, and to love and accept who they are. This helps to stimulate their creative process. “Simulating one’s self-image evokes a sense of self- confidence,” Kenyut said.

Kenyut during his presentation to children of "I Love Me - the Selfie Project" at Tepi Sawah Festival. Image Richard HorstmanKenyut demonstrates the selfie technique to children at Rumah Apik, during the Tepi Sawah Festival.

“I believe selfies to be narcissistic behavior – a desire to love one’s self excessively. The addiction we witness on social media is an empty expression constantly being repeated, reflecting people’s unbalanced psychological state. The selfie addicts look happy, but on the inside, they are not,” Kenyut said.

What effect is this addiction having upon our society? Has the selfie reduced life to a popularity contest, driven by the external myth of beauty and the need to compare ourselves with others, governed by likes, Instagram followers and Facebook friends? The ancient Egyptians understood the relevance of distinguishing and connecting with the self. Within the inner sanctum of the Luxor Temple on the east bank of the Nile River, a proverb states, “Man, know thyself, and you are going to know the gods”.

I Love Me – the Selfie Project encourages people to reflect upon their inner worlds. This, Kenyut believes, is the key to the most powerful door of all. Contemporary artists increasingly play essential roles within the positive development of modern society. They challenge our understanding of ourselves and help others to see things differently and to learn about the world. Importantly, they shine light on issues that need to be individually and collectively addressed for the sake of a sustainable, more peaceful and loving world.

The Exhibition "I Love Me - the Selfie Project" at Laramona, Ubud. Image Merio Falindra            the Selfie Project at Laramona, Ubud – Image Merio Falindra

https://www.facebook.com/djunaidi.kenyut

Words & Images: Richard Horstman & Merio Falindra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drawing Future: Charcoal for Children 2016/17 Charity Exhibition

Creativity during opening of DRAWING FUTURE Image Richard Horstman

Cush Cush Gallery of Denpasar announced its arrival onto the Bali art scene in July 2016 with Crucible, the gallery’s collaborative exhibition with Australian designer, educator and academic Ross McLeod.

Exploring ideas of alchemical synthesis, association of natural process, and craftsmanship, McLeod’s sculptural objects were enhanced by Cush Cush Gallery’s savvy presentation – the impact was immediate. A fresh, alternative gallery, highlighted by a sound vision was born, a timely, and exciting contribution to the island’s art infrastructure.

DRAWING FUTURE opening. Image Richard Horstman

The opening of DRAWING FUTURE: Charcoal for Children 2016/17 Charity Exhibition, on Friday 24 February celebrated the culmination of Cush Cush Gallery’s first CHARCOAL FOR CHILDREN 2016/17 program. The free program is designed to empower children through art and creativity, while raising environmental awareness through the making and use of DIY charcoal as a creative tool.

Six invited artists, with the help of thirty-five volunteers from local creative communities, worked together with 103 children from various backgrounds to create the exhibited collaborative artworks. The event was officiated by the Australian Consul General, Dr Helena Studdert.

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“Charcoal For Children (CFC) is a grassroots movement that is supported by the arts, design and creative communities in Bali and Indonesia, as well as friends from overseas,” Cush Cush co founder Suriawati Qiu said. “Having traveled, and lived overseas, I have witnessed how important creative education is to our future generations. We are also concerned with the lack of emphasis in art and creativity in the local education system.”

“Cush Cush Gallery wants to highlight the importance of fostering creativity in children from an early age, within a non evaluative learning framework,” adds Suriawati’s partner, and co founder Jindee Chua. “Early and consistent exposure to the arts and creativity enhances critical thinking and creative problem-solving skills in children, as well as strengthening their self confidence.”20170226_160425

The duo met while studying at RMIT Melbourne, Australia, Jindee pursuing an architecture degree, while Suriawati was studying interior design. The love of art and creativity consolidated their relationship, and they went on to form Cush Cush Gallery, a design studio workshop in Denpasar. Their focus is upon experimenting and creating with the abundant indigenous materials, textures, techniques and traditional crafts of Bali. With an emphasis on sustainability, much of their design products are up cycled resources.

Cush Cush presented ‘Make Your Own Charcoal’ workshop in August 2016 as a part of their LagiLagi programs up-cycling production off-cuts, giving them new life and turning them into useful things for everyday life.

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Three separate CFC workshops session were conducted in September and October 2016, and the finale in January 2017. Participating artists were Wayan ‘Suklu’ Sujana, Reno Ganesha, Noella Roos, Nyoman Wijaya, Natisa Jones and Budi ‘Kabul’ Agung Kuswara. CushCush presents a year-round program of exhibitions, and will continue to grow its residency and collaboration programs, facilitating exchanges between an international community of artists, creative, and Bali.

At art exhibitions there is usually a great divide between the art works and the creative process. Rarely is the process under the spotlight. During the opening of DRAWING FUTURE, however the creative process was on display, enriched by the enthusiasm of children of all ages busily sketching, interacting, and having fun.

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Could there be another human expression more potent and satisfying for adults to witness and adore?

DRAWING CHARCOAL: Charity For Children Exhibition 2016/17

Continues through until 13 May 2017

Jl.Teuku Umar Gg. Rajawali No.1A
Denpasar 80113, Bali, Indonesia
Tel. (62) 361 484558
www.cushcushgallery.com

Words & Images: Richard Horstman