Category Archives: Bali Graffiti

Overview of the Bali art infrastructure 2019

‘Mahardika’ the group exhibition, featured installation ‘Freedom of Expression’ 2019 by Kadek Kusuma Yatra 200 x 200cm Video installation, open 19 October – 1 December 2019 at TiTian Art Space Nyuh Kuning, Ubud

Overshadowed by the creative hubs of Java, Bandung, Jakarta and Yogyakarta, Bali is often disregarded by international art lovers and this may be due to the tourism-led commodification of art and culture.  However, in the past six years, there has been significant development in the fascinating and distinct Bali art infrastructure.

Bali was not immune to the dramatic decline that occurred after 2008 with the crash of the Indonesian modern and contemporary art markets. The immediate signs of the downturn were the closure of leading contemporary art galleries Gaya in Ubud, and Kendra in Seminyak. Activities at other notable galleries Tony Raka in Ubud and, BIASA ArtSpace in Seminyak wound down as well. Only galleries financially supported by profitable hotels, namely  Komaneka in Ubud, Santrian in Sanur and Ganesha in Jimbaran maintained their exhibition schedules.

During the post-boom period, the established art institutions Museum Puri Lukisan, Neka Art Museum, ARMA and Bentara Budaya Bali continued with consistent programmes. The museum exhibitions were mostly dedicated to the Ubud, Batuan, Keliki and Pengosekan traditional Schools of painting, while representing an array of artists in group and solo shows, including Ketut Madra, Wayan Darlun and Made Astawa. Significant developments in the contemporary art infrastructure occurred with the opening of artist-driven initiatives Luden House in Ubud in 2009, Cata Odata Art Space in Ubud in 2014, and Ketemu Project Space in Batubulan in 2015. 

The large white bamboo installation ‘Not For Sale’ set in rice fields north of Ubud by Balinese landowner, social activist, and artists Gede Sayur and friends, quickly became a unique landmark.  Committed to art with a social and environmental conscience, Sayur founded Luden as an art space and gallery. ‘Not For Sale’ evolved in 2010 in response to the alarming rate of Balinese agricultural land being sold for development and grew to become a social movement. Cata Odata focused their cross-disciplinary programmes towards emerging artists from East Java and Bali, while Ketemu’s model has a strong regional focus on programmes including artists and curators. Their July 2016 group exhibition at Sudakara Art Space, Sanur “Merayakan Murni”(Celebrating Murni), a tribute to the iconic Balinese woman artist IGAK Murniasih (1966-2006), was one of the most anticipated events that year. These initiatives provided a much-needed impetus for the art community.

Developments within the traditional art world were the formation of new collectives Baturlangun in Batuan village and the Werdi Jana Kerti Artists Association in Keliki. Strong leadership dedicated to regeneration of the styles has led to exciting new talent emerging from both of these villages in recent years such as Wayan Aris Sarmanta and Wayan Budiarta from Batuan and Putu Kusuma and Putu Adi from Keliki. Baturlangun’s first exhibition at ARMA in 2012 featured works by emerging, established, and senior artists, including women. Since 2006 Larasati Auctioneers has established an international forum for the trade of high-quality Balinese art, providing strong support in developing the market.  Two yearly auctions are held in Ubud, which expanded to three sales in 2019.

‘Kayu’ a new alternative platform for Indonesian and international contemporary art, opened in 2014, at Rumah Topeng Dan Wayang Setia Dharma (House of Masks & Puppets), in Mas, Ubud. Curated by Ubud based Italian artist Marco Cassani, ‘Kayu’ is an exhibition series that is a part of a global initiative by Lucie Fontaine for the exchange of information and knowledge between the global art world.

The opening of Art Bali 2019 “Speculative Memories” was highlighted by a fashion parade by the Fashion Council of Western Australia (FCWA) which annually holds the Perth Fashion Festival (PFF)

One of the most significant inclusions in the infrastructure TiTian Art Space, after three years in Jalan Bisma, this October moved to larger, more accessible premises in Nyuh Kunning, Ubud. An artist incubator nurturing emerging talent to become art entrepreneurs, it was established by the TiTian Bali Foundation and the vision of Balinese art and entrepreneurial expert Soemantri Widagdo.  The annual TiTian Prize, with sections for children and adult, has quickly attracted the island’s finest talent to participate, propelling the winners Nyoman Arisana and Wayan Aris Sarmanta, into the national spotlight. The recent exhibition “Mahardika” 19 October – 1 December featured works by Wayan Sadu, Nyoman Bratayasa and Kadek Kusuma Yasa.

Bali’s rapidly evolving street art movement is transforming the streets of urban and rural Bali. Swiss urban art enthusiast Julien Thorax opened the gallery and art supplies shop in Canggu, ALLCAPS Store, in 2015. A vibrant sub-culture of social media savvy millennials, and national and international street artists now thrive in the Canggu – Berawa Beach area.

An exhibition highlight of 2019 ‘Drawing Bali Today’ 10 October – 10 November at Sika Gallery, Ubud revealed developments within the context of Balinese technical painting by emerging and mid-career artists. Such developments have been a response to the ‘Neo Pitimaha’ art movement, established in 2013 by art provocateurs Gede Mahendra Yasa and Kemal Ezedine, who have been hosting events and exhibitions in Bali and Java from 2016. The movement reinterprets Balinese traditional technical painting from a contemporary art perspective – retaining the principles involved with the techniques and methods.  By opening this to new viewpoints they awakened a new spirit and introduced a fresh model of possibilities into Balinese art. Ezedine has recently been proactive with exhibitions with some of the core members of the movement, while his “Drawing Lab”, continues on with the Neo Pitamaha ideals influencing the mindset of young Balinese painters.

In just as few years CushCush Gallery, a dynamic and highly active multi-disciplinary platform open in July 2016 in Denpasar and founded by Suriawati Qiu and Jindee Chua, has become the most vital addition to the infrastructure, next to TiTian. An art and design hub dedicated to supporting the many local and international creatives and communities in and around the city, the breadth of their annual DenPasar event, which began in 2017, is always fresh and inspiring.

Artists pose with their works during the opening of during the opening of “Art Exhibition by Children Sanggar Bares – There is no Truth only HONESTY” 12 – 31 October 2019 at the Nyana Tilem Museum, in Mas. Image courtesy Soemantri Widagdo

An international standard exhibition space and contemporary art exhibition has finally arrived in Bali. The major drive for both initiatives that opened late 2018, however, comes from Java. ART • BALI, the exhibition this year in its second edition, and the purpose-built AB • BC Building in Nusa Dua, funded by BEKRAF the Agency for Creative Economy Indonesia, are exciting developments of a global art calibre upon the art landscape. 

Heri Pemad Management from Yogyakarta introduced their ‘ArtJog’ model, highlighting Indonesian contemporary artists with invited internationals. The annual ‘Bali Masters’ exhibition was first held in March 2019; its second edition is due early 2020. External direction over locally based management, and Javanese curators, however, may not be the best mode of capitalizing on Bali’s distinct artistic character and presenting it on the international stage. ‘Balinese Masters: Aesthetic DNA Trajectories of Balinese Visual Art’ featured an array of strong work, the show suffered, however, from confusing curatorial objectives, beginning with a puzzling title, and then including too much work without the benefit of a practical chronological order allowing it to be easily read and understood by the audience.

Tony Raka Art Gallery now merges tribal art with the contemporary, along with the ‘Art Lounge’ activated a few years ago. The venue has recently grown to include the ‘Creative Space’, an expansive event facility at the rear of his gallery. Open 2016 Nyaman Gallery in Seminyak has quickly made its mark, while evolving to include workshop facilities. Uma Seminyak, a new display space open 2017 highlights emerging Balinese and Indonesian contemporary artists and designers.  BIASA ArtSpace has revamped its vision with the new BIASACube, an exhibition space within their Kerobokan boutique open early 2018, and another space BIASA Ubud opened late last year, next door to their boutique in Sanggingan. 

Government support for modern and contemporary art is entering a new era. Gurat Art Project, an arm of the research and curatorial initiative Garut Institute, with the aid of the Badung Regency Administration, has been presenting events now since 2017. The 2019 five-year appointment of artist Dr Wayan Kun Adnyana as the Director of the Cultural Office of Provincial Bali has had an immediate impact ‘Bali Megarupa’ (10 October – 10 November) which featured 103 artists exhibiting at ARMA, Museum Puri Lukisan, Neka Art Museum and Bentara Budaya Bali Cultural Center. “Bali Megarupa” will continue annually for five years with the intention of becoming a yearly long-term fixture on the Bali art calendar consolidated by Provincial law.

‘Ancient Memories’ 2019 – Joel Singer, digital montages from an ongoing series by Singer, some of which were on display at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, Mas, Ubud

2019 closed with two more significant additions to the Bali art infrastructure – Ubud Diary a new gallery opened 30 November with a group exhibition of Ubud School paintings and a book launch “Ubud Diary: Celebrating the Ubud School of Painting – the Diversity of the Visual Language”. Ubud Diary’s mission is to create a new awareness to the historically significant, yet declining Ubud School. BATU Art Space, a Space For Contemporary Art Collection and Research at the House of Masks & Puppets in Mas, Ubud opened 7 December highlighted by “Manifesto” an exhibition by leading Australian artist Sally Smart.

This article was first published:

https://www.artandmarket.net/analysis/2019/12/28/bali-art-infrastructure-2019

Words and Images, unless specified: Richard Horstman

Bali’s street art maverick Julien Thorax

 

IMG_3344                                             Julien Thorax

 

Bali is a rich and unique optical feast. Yet the ominous visual pollution of billboards and advertising, unchecked development and urban sprawl, traffic, fumes, and idle trash makes for an uber serious contrast. Street Art, however is radically transforming the urban landscape of the island. Resonating out from once lifeless edifices, vibrant and alluring images capture our attention, and ignite the imagination. Street art beautifies, informs, inspires, and confronts, while momentarily gifting our sensitivities some vital relief.

Street art fanatic and collector Julien Thorax grew up in Switzerland and then worked across Europe in the corporate world until 2015 when he uprooted and exited for Bali. Owner of the urban art gallery and art supplies store ALLCAPS in Canggu, Julien is the founder of the Tropica Bali Street Art Festival (the urban culture, street art and music event held in Canggu July 2016 & 2017). He is also one of the organizers of the wildly successful new addition to Indonesia’s leading international art fair Art Stage Jakarta 2017 – Off The Wall Jakarta: Europe – ASEAN. Set within 3000 square meters in the Sheraton Grand Jakarta Gandaria City Hotel, Off The Wall Jakarta paired some of Europe’s hottest street artists along with budding ASEAN talent, injecting some urgently needed pizzazz into the exhausted art fair model.

Art by midaskid                                                   art by midaskid

A new urban youth culture has quickly evolved and is now thriving on Bali. The meeting of the art & design, surf, graffiti, mural and hipster communities into a new local/international subculture – its catalyst is the street art scene. LifeasArtAsia corners the prime mover behind Bali’s burgeoning Street Art scene – Julien Thorax:

LAA: Pease share a little about your mission?

JT: Firstly, I want support some of the local artists to make them more visible on the global street art scene, while making Bali a happening destination for graffiti and street artists from around the world. Via ALLCAPS I want to establish an internationally recognized urban art gallery and community space. My endeavor is that within 3-5 years the Tropica Bali Street Art Festival will be the biggest International Street Art and Graffiti Festival in Southeast Asia.

I also want to show local people that graffiti is not always vandalism but can be a beautiful form of modern art, along with utilizing murals and events to spotlight environmental issues, or to support NGOs.

DCIM101GOPROGOPR5850.                                         Allcapsstore & art space in Canggu

LAA: What was the idea behind creating the Bali StreetArt website?

JT:  I wanted to help to connect all the local people and communities involved in “Urban Art”, the mural “komunitas” from Denpasar, the graffiti artists, and the stencil artists, who were more or less all working independently from each other. Graffiti boys hanging out with graffiti boys, stencil artists working alone, mural artists staying within their communities in Denpasar. I tried, and succeeded into bringing them under one banner.

Next was to include the international artists visiting Bali. For me, Bali StreetArt is all the “Urban Art” created on the walls of Bali, irrespective of the artist’s origin (Balinese, Javanese, Australian, French, whatever), this is what we achieved with Tropica Festival, among others. And ALLCAPS has become a central meeting point for all urban art artists, and fans.

The side effect is that many of these artists, with their different backgrounds and various creative friends and communities are bringing a lot of other sub or alternative cultures into the movement; musicians, DJs, tattoo artists, skaters etc. All feel confortable coming to ALLCAPS, or to our events because they are sure to meet some of their friends and have a good time. This was happening before I arrived, but we are key into making it bigger and more visible.

DCIM101GOPROGOPR5854.                                                       Allcaps

LAA: Is the Bali street art scene an art movement, or a social movement?

JT: This is more an art movement at the moment that is slowly becoming a social movement. Yet this will take time.

LAA: What role is social media playing in this urban art development?

JT: Social media plays a key role, especially in a developing country like Indonesia where the majority of people use smartphones. Instagram is popular because it is easy to use, to connect, and to share. Street art and graffiti artists and fans are making big use of this application. This is directly influencing the way people paint and create murals.

Until recently artists painted murals only in “visible”, prime locations. Nowadays they are keen to paint anywhere, as long as they can get a good “Instagram shot”. They don’t really care if the wall will be seen, or the mural is going to stay up for years. With Instagram they can share instantly to the multitude of global followers. Bali gets visibility and interest on the global scene because of social media due to the unique images we post, such as murals on the beach and in the middle of rice paddies.

27992857_735606626647128_7980862004421731372_o    Allcapsstore – Bali’s premiere graffitit and street art supply center & art space

29872441_765503400324117_7393250604400613416_o                       Some of the friendly, professional staff at Allcapsstore

DCIM101GOPROGOPR5852.

 

https://balistreetart.org/

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Courtesy Allcaps